Imagine Imagination: The Image and Magic of Imagination

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Imagine Imagination: The Image and Magic of Imagination By Rocky Reichman “Imagine a world in which socially responsible and eco-friendly practices actually boost a company’s bottom line,” reads the Cover quote for the Jan. 29, 2007 issue of BusinessWeek. The word imagine is quickly becoming the most popular term used in the business world. “Imagine it” is a phrase favored by investors and entrepreneurs alike. Loved by corporate managers and chief executives. “Imagine it” means to think creatively and form a mental image of something. “Picture it.” Imagination (noun form) ...

October 16, 2010

The Sphinx of Tongue

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The Sphinx of Tongue By Melika Salihbeg Bosnawi a w o r d a b o u t t r a n s l a t i o n     This word ... came into existence from blood, from each drop of blood, from each red drop of blood flowing through my veins in the course of writing of the greatest part of my poems. The first winter of One Thousandth Nine Hundred and Eighty Second year, why shouldn't I say, just as it was happening, a January and February chill; a rheumatic fragility of the attic’s ...

January 21, 2010

Can a Monkey be Taught to Type Shakespeare?

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Mathematical Linguistics by Jack Reichman, Ph.D.   There are some who would believe that given enough time and energy, a monkey could be taught to type, get lucky, and write some memorable prose. These are probably the same people who believe that luck plays the major role in all art. Let’s see if that is really true by doing a thought experiment.

December 13, 2009

Linguistics Essay: Britishisms

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British Language, Grammar and Spelling: The Difference By Rocky Reichman   English is a shape shifter. Our language is spoken in dozens of forms and in dozens of dialects. Each country has its own version of English, with its rules and nuances. But the most popular ways of speaking English are the British way and American way. Sure, Americans and British do speak the same language, English. But there are differences in spelling, grammar and even language itself.     As an Editor for Literary Magic, an online and therefore international magazine, I speak with writers from over a dozen countries around the world. Literary Magic, receives most of its submissions from writers in the ...

October 23, 2009

Words Get New Meanings: Is that Awesome or Aweful?

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The Etymology of the word Awesome   By Rocky Reichman     “Awesome!”   Today this word is synonymous with cool. It’s used to describe something as exciting or special. “That new video game is awesome.”   But this isn’t what awesome really is. Awe means “fear, respect.” It’s describes someone or something that is “revered and feared,” not “cool” or “hot.” At least that’s what it used to mean. Check old literature. Read the Bible. The first testament uses the word “awe” often, denoting god or some higher figure. Is the bible calling anyone or anything “cool”? No way! It’s using the traditional definition of awesome, to describe something as feared or respected. Here’s the etymology of awesome ...

October 19, 2009

The Etymology of Begging the Question

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Begging the Question: Do I know what it is, what about you, do you know what it is?   By Rocky Reichman     When you Google begging the question, you get 10,100,000 results (interestingly, the more common [and commonly listed in dictionaries] beg the question only brings half that many.) After checking Webster’s New World Dictionary, I discovered that begging the question means either “to use an argument that assumes as proved the very thing one is trying to prove, or, loosely, to evade the issue.”     In short, begging the question is when someone tries to avoid, or get out of, the question. The origin of the phrase begging the question is for certain, ...

October 19, 2009

Adverbs: Speaking Correctly

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By Rocky Reichman     Everybody hates Adverbs these days. Those words ending with the suffix -ly are looked upon with murderous eyes. Most grammar articles concerning adverbs only talk about how bad they are. Why writers should never ever ever use them. One article I read even urged the reader “kill” Adverbs.   But, I say, don’t be hatin’.   This article is written in Adverbs’ defense, not prosecution. Usually adverbs get nothing but criticism. But they are under attack. The -ly suffix is being under-used. But Adverbs deserve more. Why?   Adverbs are getting less popular in the English lexicon. People forget to use them more and more often. They ...

October 17, 2009

Etymology of Logline

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By Rocky Reichman       “What is a logline?” asks Mr. Stevens, a professor of English and a former teacher of mine. platitude   A logline is a brief, one-sentence synopsis of something. (Not to be confused with the more commonly occurring long line, which is a completely different word). While the word itself is not commonly used, it has multiple, very important usages in everyday society.   In the media and publishing world, writers query book and magazine editors to propose articles for publication. Loglines are an essential part of a writer’s query letter, as it sums up what the writer’s proposed article or book will be about.   And loglines is are even more important in business. ...

October 17, 2009